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iLabs: Fall Family Class “Teaser” for the Micro World

July 25, 2014

It’s that time of year in the Micro World iLab where we’re putting our schedule of upcoming family lab classes together.

To give you a “taste” of what’s coming, I’ve included some class information below, for the programs we’ll be doing in September-November.

There will be more topics coming for sure, such as:

  • Our 4-part Drug Development series.
  • Advanced Microbiology.
  • A new 2-part Immunology class series.
  • Organic Chemistry.
  • Proteomics and Genomics series.

In addition, we will be collaborating with Bob Alderink in the Natural World Investigate Lab, for a brand new Chemistry I series.

And there will be additional  “Science Thursdays”  classes coming, such as the chemistry of perfumes, and the science of Twinkies.

So be watching the Museum website  in late July and early August for postings on the new Programs and Events for this year, as well as the listings for  Science Thursdays .

In the meantime, since you took the time to visit our blog, here’s a “teaser” of what’s to come:

SEPTEMBER
Tuesdays:
September 16 & 23, 2014, 10:00 – noon. Human Body Systems: What Happens Where? $ 35 per parent/child pair; $17 each additional child. 11 and older

Description: Week one will include using models and hands-on activities to explore five major human body systems (digestive, nervous, circulatory, excretory and respiratory) and learning how each system functions to maintain life. During the second class students will dissect a fetal pig, which has anatomic similarities to the human body, to explore these systems in greater detail.

OCTOBER
Tuesdays:
October 7, 2014, 10:00 – noon. Travels Through Indigestion: The GI Tract. $20 parent/child pair; $10 each additional child. 11 and older

Description: What does a pancreas do? What is a “jejunum”? Where are they even found? Join us for a journey through one of the longest systems in the body, the digestive system, and learn what goes on “once you swallow those french fries.” Through the use of models, hands-on activities and a demo-dissection, you’ll learn how things work and where things happen once your dinner leaves your mouth.

Saturdays:
October 4 & 25, 2014, 10:00 – noon. Beneath the Surface: Ecosystem of a Pond. $ 35 per parent/child pair; $17 each additional child. 10 and older

Description: This two-part hands-on class will delve into the functions of an ecosystem in nature, specifically focusing on a freshwater pond ecosystem. Students will set-up a project in the first class, as well as learn what goes on beneath the pond surface and who lives there. The following week, they will learn formal microscopy techniques, such as how to use a compound microscope and make a wet mount, in order to complete the activity and view pond cultures.

NOVEMBER
Tuesdays:
November 4, 11, & 18, 2014, 10:00 – noon. Grow It, Stain It, Identify It: Cell Biotech. $ 50 per parent/child pair; $25 each additional child. 12 and older.

Description: This is a 3-week series designed to introduce the student to currently-used techniques in Cell Biology. We will grow insect cell cultures, examine them for development, learn about the many different types of cells in our bodies, and how various staining techniques help to distinguish cell features. In addition the students will get an introduction to the most necessary tool in this field—sterile technique—by learning to work in a biosafety hood. Other lab techniques, such as cell counts, will also be performed.

Saturdays:
November 1, 2014, 10:00 – noon. Grandparent/Grandchild Day: Spy Chemistry in the American Revolution. $20 grandparent/grandchild pair; $10 each additional person. 9 and older. (And parents are welcome too!)

Description: During the American Revolution, both sides desperately needed fast and accurate intelligence about what the other army was doing. Even when spies discovered important information, the biggest problem was how to get it to their commanders without being caught. Enter the world of historical espionage and learn from an actual event how Colonial spies used the principles of chemistry to ensure their messages got safely to the intended party.

 

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